Writer’s train of thought

MINUTES after the 07.10 pulls out of Biggleswade station on a weekday morning commuter Jeremy Garner starts work. It has nothing to do with his normal daily routine in London as a creative director for one of the UK s largest digital marketing companies.

MINUTES after the 07.10 pulls out of Biggleswade station on a weekday morning commuter Jeremy Garner starts work.

It has nothing to do with his normal daily routine in London as a creative director for one of the UK's largest digital marketing companies.

The reason he immediately starts tapping away on his laptop is because he is more than likely to be creating another chapter for his latest novel.

The train journey is the perfect platform for Mr Garner, 35, who writes under the pen name of Seth Garner, and has three novels on the bookshelf and a fourth in the pipeline.

The flavour of his books often reflects where he lives in Gamlingay with his wife Midori, 39, and two young children after moving to the village from Hong Kong.

Some of the plots are also inspired by his daily train journey to London and his working life.

Most Read

His latest book, Broken Surface, tells the haunting story of a 15-year-old murder. Two teenagers kill a mentally handicapped boy called Doofy. It was an accident but they hide the body.

But as Duncan and Richard grow up the secret continues to haunt them both until they have to face the horrors of the past when Doofy's body is found and their secret is revealed with dire consequences.

"The book is inspired by real events. In 2002 when I began the book, originally entitled One Percenter, I was running a start-up agency in London called BloodPartnership and sold the company," said Mr Garner.

"The deal was that the other company would buy the remaining 49 per cent of BloodPartnership after three years. We had been making good money but after September 11 that year the advertising industry went into freefall and the company who was buying us saw their share price fall from 147p to just 8p.

"It meant we had to close down but I thought it would make the good opening for a book so that is how the book starts, with a struggling advertising agency followed by the murder and the body buried in a millpond."

Talking about his writing routine, Mr Garner, who lives in Church End, added: "The train is often busy and occasionally I have to work standing up.

"The journey is only 40 minutes but it keeps my writing pacy and brisk. Usually I can write between 300 and 500 words per train journey but I have written 1,000.

"I wrote the first draft of the book pretty quickly. In addition to writing on the train, I often burn the midnight oil too. It took about five or six months to complete.

"I sent off three chapters to all the agents of the Writer's and Artist's Yearbook and was amazed when one rang up and asked to see the full manuscript.

"Inspiration can come at any time. The idea of Broken Surface came when I was sitting in a meeting learning that the company I was running was about to be closed down.

"The most important thing is to write the ideas down before they are forgotten. To this end, when I am thinking about the next book, I usually carry a small notepad around so I can quickly jot down any ideas quickly.

"I love writing and have done all my life so getting my books published is very rewarding.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter