Work halts on heath project

PUBLISHED: 12:08 13 April 2006 | UPDATED: 10:01 06 May 2010

The heath

The heath

THE felling of trees on a 145-acre site at the RSPB reserve in Sandy has been halted until the autumn. Eventually the site will be turned into heathland for the first time in 150 years. But with the breeding season for birds and other wild animals now beg

THE felling of trees on a 145-acre site at the RSPB reserve in Sandy has been halted until the autumn.

Eventually the site will be turned into heathland for the first time in 150 years.

But with the breeding season for birds and other wild animals now beginning, the chainsaws have been silenced for a few more months at least.

Travellers along the Potton Road can see all the work that has gone on throughout the winter with a large swathe of trees having been cleared at Sandy Warren.

It is estimated that 5,000 tons of conifer, sycamore and silver birch have been cleared and sold on to many industries to cover the cost of the project.

Some of the timber will be turned into window frames and other building materials including chipboard and also paper and firewood.

Many dead trees have been left for insects to flourish and to be used by birds such as woodpeckers.

Although the felling will open up a large area of woodland, the edges of the woodland and the view of Sandy from a forested hilltop will remain unchanged.

Over the next decade the RSPB will work to create an ideal habitat for birds, bees, bats and badgers.

The RSPB hopes to open up the first paths through the woodland soon, possibly by the end of May.

"Around 10 years from now the heath should be a beautiful purple colour which will attract a lot more wildlife and insects to the reserve," said RSPB site manager Peter Bradley.

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