Villages will suffer - quarry protesters

PUBLISHED: 11:51 08 June 2006 | UPDATED: 10:17 06 May 2010

THE fight to prevent a quarry being dug on the outskirts of a picturesque village is gathering pace. Residents in Broom are determined to sink plans by Tarmac to dig for aggregates on a 260-acre site south of the village before they are delivered to Bedfo

THE fight to prevent a quarry being dug on the outskirts of a picturesque village is gathering pace.

Residents in Broom are determined to sink plans by Tarmac to dig for aggregates on a 260-acre site south of the village before they are delivered to Bedfordshire County Council.

Now a group of residents are formulating their action plan saying the quarry would also bring misery to other villages in the area with heavy lorries travelling backwards and forwards to the A1.

"We have calculated there would be 120 lorry movements every day and this could last for 20 years," said anti-quarry group member Issy Rondel, who lives in Broom.

"Our protests will get louder over the coming weeks and months as we seek support from residents in other villages around Broom who will also be affected.

"The environment is also going to be hit. The population of indigenous garden birds has plummeted over the past 10 years and once-common visitors to our gardens are not there anymore. All wildlife and the fauna will suffer from another quarry.

"Another quarry will mean the water table will be altered for ever and plant and animal life will not return. The creation of artificial lakes may be portrayed as an enhancement. Vast numbers of migrant waterfowl may look attractive from a distance but their noise and droppings already pollute Broom.

"If avian flu does become a reality in Britain, will these invaders be welcome?"

A number of campaign meetings are being planned to make it a summer of discontent among villagers in Broom.

"We will not be steamrollered into submission," added Mr Rondel.

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