Turbines generate some positive reactions

A TURBULENT response expected to the proposal to erect wind turbines on farmland failed to materialise when crowds gathered at a public meeting. More than 100 people were at Weston Village Hall on Tuesday to hear a pitch from farmers John and Paul Cherry,

A TURBULENT response expected to the proposal to erect wind turbines on farmland failed to materialise when crowds gathered at a public meeting.

More than 100 people were at Weston Village Hall on Tuesday to hear a pitch from farmers John and Paul Cherry, of Darmalls Hall Farm, Weston.

If planning permission is granted, the brothers will raise three turbines on Weston Hills which - including the length of the blades - will reach the heady heights of 120 metres.

John Cherry said: "We take the beauty of this landscape and countryside very seriously. But what happens when the oil runs out? It's a fool's paradise not to plan ahead."


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Despite expected opposition to the idea, collective feeling seemed in favour of the plan.

Dave Standing, owner of the village post office, said: "I think the majority of people are really for it.

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"We have to think of future generations and we are collectively responsible.

"I can think of worse things that could be on the skyline."

The three turbines would generate six MW of electricity - enough to supply around 3,300 homes - and reduce carbon emissions by around 15,300 tonnes per year.

Sceptics in the group questioned the noise and visual impact of the turbines.

One resident, who did not want to be named, said: "I think it's a good idea but Herts Highways have spent a lot of money putting tunnels through the hills as part of the bypass so they don't spoil this very skyline."

John Cherry said: "The visual impact shouldn't be too great and we would change the entire plan if we thought the noise would affect any individual."

The nearest house to the turbines would be 700 metres away - more than twice the legal requirement of 300 metres.

As an additional sweetener, John and Paul pledged to set up a trust and "make a large sum of money available for village projects."

Even if planning permission is granted soon, the turbines will not appear on the skyline for at least a year.

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