Too much booze shortens your life

BIG BOOZERS in Comet country are knocking months off their lives, according to new statistics. Researchers at John Moores University in Liverpool have calculated the damage done by heavy drinking by working out the average number of months lost off people

BIG BOOZERS in Comet country are knocking months off their lives, according to new statistics.

Researchers at John Moores University in Liverpool have calculated the damage done by heavy drinking by working out the average number of months lost off people's lives in each local authority area.

Men in Stevenage came off worse in the statistics, losing on average 9.79 months, followed by their North Herts counterparts, who lose 7.48 months.

Gentlemen in Mid Beds came out best, losing 6.48 months.

The figure for Stevenage men put them in the bottom half of all local authority areas, coming 205th out of 354.

Women lose fewer months due to alcohol, coming in at 5.05 months in Stevenage and 3.67 months in Mid Beds.

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In North Herts the figure was 2.69 months, making ladies in the district seventh best out of 354 areas.

But us southerners are still healthier than those in the north of the country, as the survey revealed a huge North/South divide, with men in Blackpool knocking an enormous 22.8 months off their lives due to drink.

A spokesman for North Herts and Stevenage Primary Care Trust said: "For thousands of local people, drinking in moderation is an enjoyable part of socialising with their friends or family.

"But a significant minority who ignore the dangers of drinking to excess are putting their health and even their lives at risk in the process.

"Drinking a large amount in one go (binge drinking) can be very bad for your health - and we're not just talking about the short term dangers of getting into a fight or dealing with your hangover the next morning

"The long term health effects of heavy drinking are very serious and can lead to heart disease, stroke, cancer, liver disease and, as these startling figures show, could even shorten your life.

"As well as supporting those who need help to try and give up alcohol, the PCT works with local councils and the police through community safety partnerships to promote sensible drinking and give people the information they need to help them make responsible decisions about alcohol.