The menace of MRSA

PUBLISHED: 12:54 26 October 2006 | UPDATED: 11:06 06 May 2010

Interesting facts * Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) is a bacteria that has become resistant to most commonly used antibiotics * You cannot tell by looking at someone that they have MRSA * MRSA does not affect healthy people * Many peopl

Interesting facts

* Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) is a bacteria that has become resistant to most commonly used antibiotics

* You cannot tell by looking at someone that they have MRSA

* MRSA does not affect healthy people

* Many people carry MRSA but are not harmed by the bacteria

* You can potentially acquire MRSA from anywhere but it is more common in hospitals because sick people are more vulnerable to infection

What the Trust is doing to combat MRSA

* The Trust has launched its own Clean Hands campaign as well as joining the national campaign

* Staff have 24-hour access to infection control advice

* Patients from nursing homes, those who are transferred from other hospitals and those who have had MRSA previously are tested

* Positive MRSA blood cultures are reported to the Health Protection Agency

* Good dust control is carried out in the hospital

* A new cleaning contract has been implemented based on the specifications in the NHS standards of cleanliness document

* Monthly spot checks are now carried out by Patient Environ-ment Action Group

* Ward housekeepers have been introduced to help ensure the smooth running of a ward, including overseeing cleaning

What you can do

* Only accept antibiotics as a last resort to prevent germs developing a resistance to them

* Ask hospital staff if they have washed their hands

* Wash your hands before and after visiting a patient

* Visitors should not come to hospital if they know they have a cold or infection

* Avoid bringing small children into hospital. If you must, make sure they are not transferring germs by lying on floors or climbing over beds

* Stay healthy - don't smoke, drink and eat in moderation and take plenty of exercise to avoid infections and ill health generally


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