Stevenage woman joins celebrity sonique for cancer charity single

A STEVENAGE woman who lost her sister and father to cancer has joined celebrities to record a unique charity single in aid of Cancer Research UK. Esther Dilley, 58, of Bedwell Crescent, features on the remake of Cyndi Lauper s 1980s classic, Girls Just Wa

A STEVENAGE woman who lost her sister and father to cancer has joined celebrities to record a unique charity single in aid of Cancer Research UK.

Esther Dilley, 58, of Bedwell Crescent, features on the remake of Cyndi Lauper's 1980s classic, Girls Just Wanna Have Fun.

The track is led by DJ and singer Sonique, who is currently undergoing treatment for breast cancer, and is set for release in late April.

Mrs Dilley's sister, Krishnaveni, died after being diagnosed with bone cancer when Ms Dilley was 11 and she was 12.


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"Everything happened so quickly," said Mrs Dilley. "She only lived six months after being diagnosed.

"Our father, who died from cancer of the liver three years ago, was the only person who knew she only had months to live. It was a shock and, even now, it helps to talk about it."

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Girls Just Wanna Have Fun will be sold exclusively by Tesco, and will be available for download on iTunes.

Other female celebrities featured on the single include actress Caroline Quentin and singer Lisa Scott-Lee, and mobile producers in shopping centres across the UK have captured women singing lines for the track over the last six weeks.

Mrs Dilley, a clerical officer, said: "It was an honour to be chosen to take part in the single. I love singing. I would love it to go to number one so that we can raise as much money as possible for Cancer Research UK."

The single is linked to the women-only fundraising event for Cancer Research UK, Race for Life.

This year's Race for Life in Stevenage will be held at Fairlands Valley Park on Sunday, July 11. For more information and to sign up, visit www.raceforlife.org

Mum-of-two Mrs Dilley, who suffers from a chronic fatigue syndrome called fibromyalgia, is taking part in the 5km Race for Life this summer.

"I like to do my bit to raise money for research and Race for Life is always a very emotional, moving and rewarding day for me," she said.

"Since research started, the death rate has dropped. The money raised is making a difference.

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