Stevenage widow takes on 100-mile charity run challenge in husband’s memory

PUBLISHED: 16:45 02 September 2020 | UPDATED: 16:45 02 September 2020

Catherine Everett, pictured here with her daughters Anna and Evie, has pledged to run 100 miles for the Motor Neurone Disease Association in memory of her husband Scott, who died from MND last summer. Picture: Courtesy of Catherine Everett

Catherine Everett, pictured here with her daughters Anna and Evie, has pledged to run 100 miles for the Motor Neurone Disease Association in memory of her husband Scott, who died from MND last summer. Picture: Courtesy of Catherine Everett

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The widow of a man who lost his brave battle with motor neurone disease last year, robbing him of the chance to see his two young daughters grow up, is running 100 miles to raise money towards research into a cure for the devastating illness.

Scott Everett was diagnosed with motor neurone disease in March 2017 and died in July last year, aged just 48. Picture: Courtesy of Catherine EverettScott Everett was diagnosed with motor neurone disease in March 2017 and died in July last year, aged just 48. Picture: Courtesy of Catherine Everett

Scott Everett, who lived in Stevenage with his wife Catherine and children Anna and Evie, was diagnosed with motor neurone disease in March 2017 and died in July last year, aged just 48. His daughters were only seven and four years old.

Since his death, Catherine has been fundraising in Scott’s name for the Motor Neurone Disease Association, in the hope that one day a cure can be found.

She had signed up to the Great South Run on October 18, but the race has been cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Undeterred, Catherine has now signed up to GSR Solo and vowed to complete 25 runs between September 1 and October 18, totalling 100 miles and culminating with the 10-mile Great South Run distance.

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She said: “I cared for Scott and watched him decline for two-and-a-half years and then, on July 19 last year, my young daughters and I said goodbye.

“His determination to not give up in the face of this cruel disease was inspirational.

“There is no cure for motor neurone disease. It slowly strips the sufferer of all physical and personal independence, leaving them trapped in a body which no longer works. It’s cruel to suffer, it’s cruel to watch.

“Great strides are being made in research to understand the disease and, one day, I believe there will be a way to slow it, if not stop it. All the money raised in Scott’s name will therefore go towards research, as was his request.”

With her daughters at home with her since lockdown began in March, finding time to train has been hard for Catherine, making her running challenge even tougher.
She said: “I’ll be wearing my MNDA running vest for every run, so please can people beep me or clap if they see me out and about to help keep me going? This is a much bigger challenge than I set out to achieve originally, so your support would be hugely appreciated.

“Thank you for helping me help fight motor neurone disease.”

To sponsor Catherine, visit justgiving.com/fundraising/catherine-everett79.


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