Stevenage man sobs in court as they hear how he burgled home of dead neighbour for drug cash

A Stevenage man who burgled the home of his dead neighbour was told by a judge on Friday it was about as mean an offence as could be imagined. Judge John Bevan QC made the remark after hearing how James Foy had broken into the flat around 10 day s after

A Stevenage man who burgled the home of his dead neighbour was told by a judge on Friday it was about as mean an offence as could be imagined.

Judge John Bevan QC made the remark after hearing how James Foy had broken into the flat around 10 day's after the man's death to steal property he traded for money to buy drugs.

Foy, 22, appeared for sentence at Luton crown court for a single offence of burglary.

Isabel Delamere prosecuting told how on July 15 this year a Mr Alfred Cox who lived in Eastgate, Stevenage died.


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The court heard living in the same two storey block was the defendant who was aware of the death.

The prosecutor said Mr Cox's son made sure the flat was secured following his father's death.

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She then told how between July 25 and July 27 the flat was broken into and items of property including a Free View box and a mini hi-fi were taken.

All told property worth �300 was taken, some of which was later traced to a shop which bought and sold second hand property.

As a result Foy was arrested.

The court heard he had a previous conviction for taking items of jewellery that belonged to is mum and selling them to raise cash for cannabis

Judge Bevan commented that having stolen from his own mother in 2008 to fund his cannabis habit he had now stolen property from a dead man again to raise cash for the drug.

On being told by James Rous defending that Foy's mum was in the public gallery supporting her son, the judge added "It looks to me as if he has made life a misery for her over the last two years."

Mr Rous said Foy had reduced his use of cannabis significantly since the burglary after realising it was at the root of is offending.

"He is asking for one last chance today even though he has come with his bags packed for prison," said Mr Rous.

The judge told Foy "It's about as unattractive and mean an offence as one can think of."

Foy sobbed in the witness box as his mother told the court she and her son were reconciled.

The judge told Foy he was going to give him a chance by deferring sentence for six months to see if he was serious about changing his ways.

He told Foy it was about time he repaid his mum with "a bit of the love" she had shown him.

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