Latest COVID-19 figures for Stevenage and North Herts show upward trend

PUBLISHED: 13:35 13 October 2020 | UPDATED: 13:35 13 October 2020

The number of confirmed cases of coronavirus has risen in Stevenage and North Herts. Picture: Darko Stojanovic / Pixabay

The number of confirmed cases of coronavirus has risen in Stevenage and North Herts. Picture: Darko Stojanovic / Pixabay

Pixabay.com

Confirmed cases of COVID-19 have steadily increased in Stevenage this week, and North Herts also continues its upward trend.

According to the Office for National Statistics, there were 34 new confirmed cases in Stevenage between October 3 and October 9.

This is up 19 on the previous week, bringing the overall total to 479.

The amount of registered deaths in the town remains at 60.

In Stevenage, there were 33 cases per 100,000 people, while in North Herts this number stood at 62. The average area in England is 77.

In the same time period, North Herts saw a further 83 cases, up 38 on the previous week. The overall total for the local authority stands at 617.

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The data shows there have been 98 coronavirus-related deaths in North Herts.

This week, we reported on the number of days that have passed since the last COVID-19 related death at the Lister Hospital.

READ MORE: How many days since last COVID-19 death at Lister hospital?

We also shared the news that pupils from The St John Henry Newman Catholic School were sent home before 10am last Thursday after positive cases were confirmed at the institution.

READ MORE: Stevenage secondary school closes for all pupils after two confirmed Covid cases

This week it was announced by PM Boris Johnson that there would be a new ‘three-tier’ local lockdown system.

The three tiers consist of ‘medium risk’, ‘high risk’ and ‘very high risk’ categories. Medium alert level will apply to most areas of the UK, and means people should continue to follow current government guidance, including the ‘Rule of Six’.

Hertfordshire as a whole has been placed in this lowest risk level.

The ‘high’ alert level will be applied to local authorities with higher numbers, and will aim to prevent household to household transmission.

‘Very high’ level areas are those, such as Liverpool, with highly concerning transmission rates. Those areas will see pubs and bars close, and people will be advised not to travel into or out of those areas.


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