Solving a sticky problem

PUBLISHED: 12:02 13 July 2006 | UPDATED: 10:28 06 May 2010

Marriotts School pupils Troy Gaverion, Laura Stredwick Amy Gates, Emma Lanaway and Stephen Takas with helper Tania Slessor (rear)

Marriotts School pupils Troy Gaverion, Laura Stredwick Amy Gates, Emma Lanaway and Stephen Takas with helper Tania Slessor (rear)

WHAT is regarded as a highly successful campaign to rid pavements of unsightly and costly to remove chewing gum has been extended into schools. It was introduced in Stevenage town centre by the borough council in a bid to encourage chewers to put their di

WHAT is regarded as a highly successful campaign to rid pavements of unsightly and costly to remove chewing gum has been extended into schools.

It was introduced in Stevenage town centre by the borough council in a bid to encourage chewers to put their discarded gum on a special disposal board called a gum target instead of dropping it on the ground.

"We are pleased with the positive effect of the gum targets in the town centre and are now encouraging schools to adopt the initiative," said a council spokesman.

So far Marriotts School has signed up and others are set to follow its lead.

Executive councillor for environment and e-government Richard Henry said: "Our town centre is significantly cleaner since we introduced the gum targets and it is pleasing to see schools embracing this scheme.

"Just one piece of chewing gum dropped on the ground costs an average of 30p to remove, so cleaning it up is an expensive business.

"Anything that can help reduce this problem while also promoting environmental awareness amongst young people is a valuable initiative."

Littered chewing gum is a problem throughout the UK with recent research showing that almost all of Britain's towns and cities are affected.


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