Security guards at Stevenage’s Lister Hospital given limited police powers to help tackle anti-social behaviour

Left to right: Hardeep Singh, Anthony Secka, contract manager Mark Parker and Insp Simon Tabert.

Left to right: Hardeep Singh, Anthony Secka, contract manager Mark Parker and Insp Simon Tabert. - Credit: Archant

Security guards at Lister Hospital in Stevenage have been given limited police powers to help tackle anti-social behaviour at the site.

The six guards at the Coreys Mill Lane hospital will now be able to order people acting anti-socially to give them their name and address. They can also hand anyone littering with a fixed penalty notice.

Insp Simon Tabert, from the Stevenage Safer Neighbourhood Team, handed out the powers and said: “This scheme has been running since 2008 giving non-police agencies a small range of powers.

“This allows identifiable, trained and vetted individuals to assist the police and council in dealing proactively with anti-social behaviour and littering issues. These officers now join a growing number of partnership employees who have passed this accreditation scheme, further improving safety and reducing crime in the town.”

Hardeep Singh, Anthony Secka, contract manager Mark Parker, Abdul Rehman, Usman Ibne Hussain and Ludek Fierlinger were all given the powers after going through an accredited course.


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They all work for firm Vinci Park Services and will have to carry a badge and identification card, given by Herts police, whenever they are working.

Before being entered on the course, all six guards were vetted and had to meet strict management, competence and training criteria.

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It is hoped this move will lead to a fall in anti-social behaviour at the hospital, especially during weekends when more people are admitted under the influence of drink and drugs.

In June, four security guards at Stevenage Leisure Park were given the same powers in an effort to stem petty crime there.

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