School’s wind of change

PUBLISHED: 12:03 04 May 2006 | UPDATED: 10:06 06 May 2010

These pupils want to win a wind turbine for their school

These pupils want to win a wind turbine for their school

PUPILS are hoping to blow away the opposition to win their school a £20,000 wind turbine. The children from Weston Primary School have entered a competition organised by Eco-Schools, a scheme run by the Foundation of Environmental Education to encourage y

PUPILS are hoping to blow away the opposition to win their school a £20,000 wind turbine.

The children from Weston Primary School have entered a competition organised by Eco-Schools, a scheme run by the Foundation of Environmental Education to encourage youngsters to take responsibility for their own environment.

To win the 12-metre high turbine, the children had to complete a feasibility study to establish if a turbine could be built on a meadow at the rear of their school.

As part of the study they had to determine whether the area was windy enough and if the turbine would obstruct the views from residents' houses. They are also waiting to hear if the district council will grant planning permission.

Headteacher Kathryn Willett said the children had worked very hard on the competition.

She said: "I am extremely pleased and proud of what they have done. We hope to hear from the council in May as to whether permission has been granted because that should hold us in good stead as far as winning the turbine is concerned.

"We are a very environmentally conscious school and the children have as much of an input in decision making as the staff.

"We have an eco-committee which was formed from children in key stage two and they meet regularly, allowing other pupils the chance to offer their ideas."

If the school does win the wind turbine Ms Willett said it could provide the electricity to run the whole school.

She said: "I would definitely like to see that happen because it would have two benefits. It would be great for the environment and would help to save the school money.

"In addition to that, any surplus electricity would be sold back to the National Grid and the school would get the money from this.


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Comet. Click the link in the orange box above for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Latest from the The Comet