School’s thumbs up for careful motorists

PUBLISHED: 14:16 06 April 2006 | UPDATED: 09:58 06 May 2010

Checking out a bike to see if it's safe

Checking out a bike to see if it's safe

DRIVERS who kept within the speed limit passing a school got a big thumbs up from watching pupils. But those who exceeded the 30mph limit got the thumbs down from the children at St Swithuns Lower School in High Street, Sandy. A survey taken of passing tr

DRIVERS who kept within the speed limit passing a school got a big thumbs up from watching pupils.

But those who exceeded the 30mph limit got the thumbs down from the children at St Swithuns Lower School in High Street, Sandy.

A survey taken of passing traffic at the school with a police speed device was monitored by police community support officers from Biggleswade.

The survey was part of an operation to try and prevent accidents and encourage drivers not to speed near schools.

When the operation, a joint initiative by the county council and the police, was launched in Sandy the speed indicators monitored approaching cars and their speed was given to pupils who held up posters as the cars passed with the thumbs up or down sign depending on how fast the cars were going.

"A few were exceeding the 30mph speed limit but by only by a few miles per hour," said Sandy beat officer Pc Lee Prutton.

"No drivers were stopped. But if they were speeding the children certainly got across the message to them with their signs.

"We will continue our campaign in Sandy, Potton and Biggleswade in an attempt to get the message across to motorists to slow down near schools and keep within the speed limits."

David Morton, headteacher at St Swithuns School, said he had been concerned for some time about the traffic speeding past the school.

"I welcome initiatives like this because we do have a problem with speeding vehicles outside our school which is a danger to children," said Mr Morton.

"Vehicles come into Sandy from Potton too fast and it is mostly commercial vehicles early in the morning and in the afternoon which are times when children are arriving for school and going home.

"This exercise with pupils telling motorists whether they liked or disliked their speed was a very good way to get the message across to them

"We encourage our pupils to walk or ride a bike to school with parents but we have to make the roads safer near all schools to prevent accidents.


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