Residents' anger at Great Ashby homes plan

ANGRY residents are objecting to plans to build 350 homes on Green Belt land in their neighbourhood. Developer Croudace held a public exhibition at the Great Ashby Community Centre on Whitehorse Lane last week to unveil plans to build about 350 homes on l

ANGRY residents are objecting to plans to build 350 homes on Green Belt land in their neighbourhood.

Developer Croudace held a public exhibition at the Great Ashby Community Centre on Whitehorse Lane last week to unveil plans to build about 350 homes on land known as Roundwood to the north-west of Great Ashby.

Evelyn Goldwater, chair of the Great Ashby Community Group, said numerous concerns about the development were raised at a meeting held by the community group following the exhibition.

She said the main objections surrounded concerns about the destruction of Green Belt land and established hedgerows, an increase in traffic, and an increased pressure on amenities and infrastructure.


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She said concerns were also raised that the exhibition lacked information, such as the exact location and density of the housing, and the results of environmental and traffic surveys.

Richard Cash, of Nevis Road, said: "The developers are looking to destroy Green Belt land and protected hedgerows.

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"There are no suggestions of improving transport links or amenities.

"Data as to how this development would add any kind of value was woefully lacking."

Stuart Monks, of Finbracks, said the primary school is currently oversubscribed, and traffic and parking in Great Ashby is already "a major issue". He is worried an increase in traffic will create "a huge safety risk for children".

Resident Graham Smith, of Snowdonia Way, said: "No rational thought appears to have been given to the problems of access and traffic."

Martin Harrop, special projects manager at Croudace, said: "The intention was to let people know, in broad terms, the quantum of development we envisage there.

"We have had to do various studies, but I wouldn't expect people to come to an exhibition and go through detailed studies.

"This isn't the only opportunity people will have to comment."

He added: "We have to submit a transport assessment as part of the planning process and convince the highways authority that what we are doing is appropriate.

"In terms of community facilities, we will make financial contributions to the various services."

Croudace has yet to submit a planning application to North Herts District Council.

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