Police take action to halt raves

PUBLISHED: 11:39 01 March 2007 | UPDATED: 11:37 06 May 2010

POLICE have put together an action plan to prevent a repeat of a rave in which four people ended up in hospital after taking drugs. The rave took place at the old Omnipak factory in Eldon Way, Biggleswade, on January 28 when over 250 people converged on t

POLICE have put together an action plan to prevent a repeat of a rave in which four people ended up in hospital after taking drugs.

The rave took place at the old Omnipak factory in Eldon Way, Biggleswade, on January 28 when over 250 people converged on the site after being kicked off a site in Milton Keynes by Thames Valley Police.

This was the second major illegal rave in the area in almost 18 months, the previous one being at an empty warehouse on the outskirts of Sandy.

Now police have gathered a list of empty factory properties that could have the potential of attracting those wanting to stage raves in the area.

Police say that by being prepared for a rave will either be a way of preventing another one happen or being able to quickly contact the owners or those responsible for properties to make them more secure.

"We now have a list of properties we feel might be suitable for these types of events and everything else will be intelligence led," said Insp John Maries of Biggleswade police.

"Often we don't known when a rave is going to be held until it has started. But we will be keeping an eye on many locations.

"It is very difficult to identify which places might be used. But at least we are trying to be prepared."

Police are also appealing to anyone who hears of possible rave sites being talked about, especially in pubs, on the internet or on mobile phones, to contact the police immediately.

With many empty industrial units in Sandy and Biggleswade, police are also asking owners to make sure properties are secure and inform them if any are tampered with.

Residents in both towns who live close to industrial units are also being asked to be vigilant and report any large numbers of people gathering or convoys of cars arriving in areas that are normally quiet.


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