Perspective: too much snow leaves me flaked out

ENOUGH is enough. As the Christmas cracker wisecrack about the weather may have observed, it s snow joke any more, writes John Adams. The white fluffy stuff may have looked pretty when it first fell and lay all about but now it has overstayed its welcome.

ENOUGH is enough. As the Christmas cracker wisecrack about the weather may have observed, it's snow joke any more, writes John Adams.

The white fluffy stuff may have looked pretty when it first fell and lay all about but now it has overstayed its welcome.

As I write, there are still remnants of it hanging about getting on for two weeks after it came down. But the forecast is that more is on the way, and I am not looking forward to it.

I was not always like this. As a child I gloried in the wintery downfalls, playing outside in it and making snowmen until my fingers were bright red and tingling with pain from the cold. I loved it.

But as I grew older my feelings changed. Where once I was ecstatic about jumping on a sled and careering brakeless down a slope, now I am cautious about getting in the car and venturing out if snow has come down because it costs much more to repair a motor than it does a sled.

I was among the first to create an ice slide in the school playground, but now I curse softly as I slip on the slippery stuff on the untreated footpaths and end up on my backside.

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Call me an old fuddy-duddy if you will, but I have gone right off snow. If I wanted to see a lot of it I would live in the Canadian wilderness or Outer Mongolia. I don't, so can we please get back to the slightly chilly, often wet weather we enjoy in this country.

I would love to put snow and ice on a list and do with it what New Yorkers did the other day.

They bid farewell to bad memories from 2009 by shredding documents, letters and photos in a public ceremony.

Hundreds of people gathered in Times Square to rid themselves of their unpleasant experiences.

Pictures of ex-lovers, redundancy letters and newspaper articles detailing the failings of favourite sports teams went into the shredder.

One woman put through a piece of paper with "writer's block" written on it with the hope that she may finally be able to pen a musical.

There was no need to worry about items which could not be shredded. Organisers provided a sledgehammer and a large waste container.

The event, the third of its kind to be staged, was called Good Riddance Day. For once, this is an American idea well worth taking up this side of the pond. I think I'll begin compiling my list ready for the end of 2010.

Things which are unlikely to last that long are New Year resolutions. I gave up making them a long time ago, but for those who still do it is interesting to note that one in 10 will be broken by January 4 and almost half won't make it into February, a new study has revealed.

Just for the record, the top five resolutions are to exercise more, change diet, spend less money, see more friends/family and drink less alcohol. All very commendable, but are they achievable?

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