Nostalgia: The story of Stratton

PUBLISHED: 12:16 14 September 2006 | UPDATED: 10:54 06 May 2010

Part of Stratton Manor House dating from Elizabethan times

Part of Stratton Manor House dating from Elizabethan times

Part One - the ancient manor from Saxon times to 1764 THE ancient manor of Stratton is now part of Biggleswade and covers the area east of the Great North Road from Toplers Hill along Drove Road to Hitchmead Road. Stratton is derived from the Roman strat

Part One - the ancient manor from Saxon times to 1764

THE ancient manor of Stratton is now part of Biggleswade and covers the area east of the Great North Road from Toplers Hill along Drove Road to Hitchmead Road. Stratton is derived from the Roman strata.

The Roman Road can be traced from Baldock to Godmanchester.

It follows the east lane of the A1 from Toplers Hill along London Road and into Drove Road.

In Saxon times Archbishop Stigand held the manor and following the Norman Conquest the manor was listed in the Domesday Book of 1080 when it was made up of four small manors covering about 900 acres.

Ralph de Lisle seems to have absorbed part of the manor into his Manor of Biggleswade.

Countess Judith, whose daughter married King David of Scotland, owned another part of the manor.

In 1231 William Rixband was holding Stratton and 100 years later it belonged to William Latimer.

Elizabeth Latimer brought the manor as a dowry to her husband Robert de Willoughby, and Richard and Alice Enderby were the next occupiers.

Their son Sir John became a Member of Parliament and loaned money to the King. Sir John's daughter Eleanor married Francis Pigot who was still living there when he died in 1509.

The Pigots had been settled at Stratton long before and had served the office of Sheriff of the counties of Bedford and Bucks as early as the year 1408.

About the latter end of the 16th century, Stratton became the property of Sir Francis Anderson of Eyeworth.

Edmund, his eldest son, left an infant daughter, Dorothy, who later became the wife of Sir John Cotton, the son of Sir Robert Bruce Cotton, a famous antiquarian and collector of coins which were kept in his house at Westminster.

During the Civil War the collection was removed to Stratton mansion.

In 1726 Sir John Cotton founded a charity school at Stratton, for the instruction of 12 poor children of the parish of Biggleswade.

It was funded by £1,800 to be laid out in lands for charitable purposes.

He died in 1752 but his charity is still active today.

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