Nostalgia: From hats to fish and chips

PUBLISHED: 11:38 22 March 2007 | UPDATED: 11:43 06 May 2010

High Street in 1977

High Street in 1977

79/81 high street It looks like an ordinary brick building, but could have originally been four timber-framed cottages. In 1838 Emily Impey, milliner, resided in part of the premises and Edmund Powers had a bakery and living accommodation. The propert

The building in Stratton Street in 1900

79/81 high street

It looks like an ordinary brick building, but could have originally been four timber-framed cottages.

In 1838 Emily Impey, milliner, resided in part of the premises and Edmund Powers had a bakery and living accommodation.

The original building is still recognisable on February 28, 2007

The properties were separated by 1851.

At number 79, Cornelius Bennett and Robert Twelvetrees had taken over the baker's shop by 1851.

Robert Twelvetrees continued as a master baker until his death around 1880 when his widow Fanny headed the business.

Control passed to Robert Twelvetrees junior who had been baking there for some time.

He carried on until 1901 when the shop was empty.

Arthur Warren opened a meat shop there in 1903.

Then followed a series of confectioners - Dan Desborough in 1910 and Edward Evans in 1925.

George Ashman was a tobacconist and confectioner from 1936 to 1947. Pat Rouse added a wholesale tobacco business before moving to number 55 in 1975.

Next, the Walter Rook furniture business expanded their premises from number 77.

Country Properties estate agents have been there for about four years.

Fanny Rogers, washerwoman, was living at No 81 in 1841.

The next resident was Mary Carrington, of independent means, who lived there from 1851 to 1871.

Then from 1871 to 1901 Edward Smith ran an ironmonger's shop.

From 1910 to 1912 it was possibly Albert Pressland's first gent's hairdressers shop.

From 1935 to 1951, Neville Smith, cycle dealer, worked from number 81, followed by his son David until 1983.

It then became Stephens Estate Agents, and by 1997 was Mega Bites Sandwich Bar.

In 1998 it became the Codfather fish and chip shop.

There was a further separation of the buildings in 1904 when number 81a was formed and Mr Baker, grocer, took over.

After a succession of occupants it more recently became a greengrocer's shop, firstly called Alexander's in 1986, then Lesley's in September 1987 and lastly Andy's Fruit Shop.

It has been The Mogul takeaway for at least four years.

Don't miss the Body Snatchers next week.


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