Nostalgia: Florist’s blossomed in the past

PUBLISHED: 11:11 08 March 2007 | UPDATED: 11:40 06 May 2010

Skipps’ shop is prominent as the Welsh Regiment march past in 1915

Skipps’ shop is prominent as the Welsh Regiment march past in 1915

FOLLOWING last week s feature on Goldthorpes, we look at some of the High Street shops that were in what was Stratton Street up to 1947. 40-42 High Street From 1838 this property appears to have been a private property. William Harper, a tailor, was her

Shops in High Street (formerly Stratton Street)

FOLLOWING last week's feature on Goldthorpes, we look at some of the High Street shops that were in what was Stratton Street up to 1947.

40-42 High Street

From 1838 this property appears to have been a private property. William Harper, a tailor, was here between 1881 and 1891.

By 1901, Esau Skipp was a confectioner and fruiterer. He also had a plant nursery in Saffron Road.

His widow Sarah Skipp continued after his death in 1909, expanding as a confectioner at number 40 and fruiterer at number 42. She ran both businesses until 1929.

Their son William Thomas Skipp married Elsie Rider in 1903. He was a nurseryman and gardener and continued to run the nursery in Saffron Road.

He opened his florist's shop at 95 High Street in about 1935 followed by his daughter Elsie Skipp in the 1950s.

Back at number 40-42, A R Daniel and C J Gale opened their confectionery shop in 1929. It closed in 1962 when Miss A R Daniel retired.

The premises were then altered for Cleanwash Laundrette and dry cleaning.

The laundrette caught fire in 1972 and the property was completely rebuilt with offices above.

Cleanwash continues, but the offices above housed the short-lived Biggleswade and Sandy Post newspaper.

This was replaced by an insurance and mortgage brokers who are still trading there today.

44 High Street

This property also appears to have been a private property with Thomas Dean, agricultural labourer, and William Reynolds, coach painter, occupants in 1881.

By 1891 William Reynolds and George Clarke, jobmaster, were in occupation.

In 1901, Peter Stanley, gardener, and Mark Chandler, wheelwright, were the occupants.

Frank Gale ran a cycle repair shop there and Horace Gale continued in 1926, adding wireless sets to the business.

He moved to the town hall in 1939.

Number 44 was rebuilt and became the Linen Shop, then by 1989 Cane Creations. In 1997 it was taken over by the present occupants Enterprise Personnel.


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