Michael Fuller: Three years for monster’ is not enough

PUBLISHED: 14:09 06 April 2006 | UPDATED: 09:58 06 May 2010

Michael Fuller

Michael Fuller

THE sentence given to a teacher who committed a string of sexual assaults on boys at a school has been criticised by pupils, the local education authority and Comet readers. Last week we reported on Michael Fuller, 42, who was caged for three years for as

THE sentence given to a teacher who committed a string of sexual assaults on boys at a school has been criticised by pupils, the local education authority and Comet readers.

Last week we reported on Michael Fuller, 42, who was caged for three years for assaults on 10 pupils at a school in Stevenage.

The police officer who led the investigation which resulted in his arrest branded Fuller as a "dangerous and calculating abusers of children".

John Harris, director of children, schools and families at Hertfordshire County Council told The Comet he did not agree with the sentence.

He said: "Michael Fuller, also known as John Richards, committed a serious breach of trust when he abused the children in his care.

"I am concerned that the gravity of his offences, which have caused immense and ongoing suffering to his victims and their families, may not have been reflected fully by the sentence handed down."

The Comet is unable to reveal which school he worked at because of a court order.

Last Wednesday police held a private meeting with the victims' parents and the headteacher at the school.

A police spokesman said: "The feedback was positive. Obviously parents were upset about the sentence - it was explained to them what the sentence meant in relation to extended licence and the earliest release date.

"They were very grateful for the support provided by the police, in particular Luke Whinnett and Jo Jones."

Since the story was published The Comet has received many letters and emails all angry at the sentence.

A student at the school where Fuller used to teach said: "I feel he should get double his current sentence at least and why was he allowed to teach in our school in the first place?"

One reader said: "Apart from the fact that Mr Fuller should have been vetted from the start, now he has been found guilty, he should have been given 15-20 years for each offence. What is the good of three years?"

Another reader said: "I feel outraged at the lenient sentence. The justice system does not put much value on the innocence of our children. Ten years would have been more appropriate."

Another said: "I believe he should have got life because he has destroyed the lives of 10 young boys. Why give him any less?"

An NSPCC spokesman said they couldn't comment on a specific case but said: "The NSPCC believes sentences for offences against children should be appropriate to the crimes committed and the harm caused to the children taking account of all the circumstances.


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