Memory of terror attacks

PUBLISHED: 11:44 06 July 2006 | UPDATED: 10:23 06 May 2010

The scene of the carnage at the Tavistock Square bus bombing

The scene of the carnage at the Tavistock Square bus bombing

SEAN Millwood was walking through Tavistock Square a year ago when a bomb ripped the top off a London bus. He has been thinking more and more about the events of July 7 2005 in the lead up to tomorrow s (Friday) anniversary of the horrific London bombing

SEAN Millwood was walking through Tavistock Square a year ago when a bomb ripped the top off a London bus.

He has been thinking more and more about the events of July 7 2005 in the lead up to tomorrow's (Friday) anniversary of the horrific London bombings which left 52 people dead.

The father-of-three was walking to work when the bus bomb exploded. He was just 70 yards away.

He said it took a while to sink in but because he had seen the emergency services at Kings Cross he realised it was a terrorist attack.

His wife and children wanted to him to stop working in London in case it happened again but Sean said: "I don't think we should change the way we live. We do have to carry on. I am not going to be diverted despite coming so close to death.

"As time goes by people become more relaxed and there is a feeling that lightning doesn't strike twice. It will not change the way we live although I still feel funny about walking near buses. I am more cautious."

But Sean, from Stanmore Road in Stevenage, said he does have some sympathy for the bombers.

"I think they were brainwashed partially by nationality and partially by religion. I believe they wanted to bring the war to the streets of Britain to show us what happens every day in the Middle East.

"I don't know how they can do what they did to themselves let alone to others. They must have really believed it was a good thing to do.

"When we learnt that they [the bombers] were from Britain it seems bizarre, especially as they had immersed themselves in British culture. I do feel sorry for them - as much as you can do."

Mr Millwood said he has always had an interest in the problems in the Middle East as he knows people who work out there."

* North Herts District Council and Stevenage Borough Council will each be holding a two-minute silence in their offices at noon tomorrow.

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