Marathon 2018: How did our North Herts runners get on?

PUBLISHED: 09:38 25 April 2018 | UPDATED: 11:36 25 April 2018

Megan completed the marathon in five hours and 46 minutes. Picture: Carl Turner

Megan completed the marathon in five hours and 46 minutes. Picture: Carl Turner

Archant

Runners from across North Herts enoyed marathon success in London on Sunday.

Megan Wright continued to train for the London Marathon just five days after giving birth. Picture: Megan WrightMegan Wright continued to train for the London Marathon just five days after giving birth. Picture: Megan Wright

Baldock mum Megan Wright raised awareness and money for Virgin Atlantic WE and Macmillan Cancer Support at the marathon, just nine weeks after giving birth.

The 33-year-old finished in 5:48:03 after training throughout her pregnancy and was determined to fundraise for Macmillan in support of her close friend who is going through cancer treatment.

Megan continued her training until 10 days before giving birth, and restarted again five days later.

She said: “I want to share my story as not only is it a personal challenge, but it will help share my friend’s story and awareness of cancer in younger people. I want it to be an inspiration to other pregnant women, that we can do anything we put our minds to.”

To support Megan, go to uk.virginmoneygiving.com/MeganWright6.

Sebastian and Mark Lemon ran the London Marathon dressed as Batman and Robin. Picture: Jacqui LemonSebastian and Mark Lemon ran the London Marathon dressed as Batman and Robin. Picture: Jacqui Lemon

Two Baldock brothers ran the entire marathon dressed as Batman and Robin on Sunday in aid of Children with Cancer and Aviation Without Borders.

Sebastian and Mark Lemon supported the two children’s charities by running inside their own Batmobile – finishing in 7:02:50.

Sebastian said: “We did the marathon in the baking heat on Sunday in just over seven hours. It was very tough in the heat and with the costumes and the Batmobile it was at times.

“Mark and I love doing the marathon, it is the best in the world. The crowd is absolutely amazing. We also had great support from our family, which was a real morale boost for us.

“We raised money for the two children’s charities because, as a father of two boys, they are causes which mean a lot to me.”

Andy Patterson in his Mr Potato Head costume before the London Marathon. Picture: Pete SmithAndy Patterson in his Mr Potato Head costume before the London Marathon. Picture: Pete Smith

In preparation for the marathon they took on the Baldock Beast challenge and the big half in London, also dressed as Batman and Robin.

To donate visit uk.virginmoneygiving.com/Batmobile.

Hitchin’s Andy Patterson came close to breaking a Guinness World Record in Sunday’s London Marathon in spite of the sweltering temperature.

The Fairlands Valley Spartan runner was trying to break the record for fastest marathon dressed as Mr Potato Head – which stood at 3:24:19.

However, Andy’s time of 3:34:25 meant he fell a little short of the record, although he has raised more than £4,000 for the Societi UK Kawasaki Foundation after his son Stanley was diagnosed with the disease last year.

Glenn Shiells ran the London Marathon in 5hrs 19mins. Picture: Lee Armitt.Glenn Shiells ran the London Marathon in 5hrs 19mins. Picture: Lee Armitt.

Speaking about the 26.2-mile challenge, Andy said: “Sunday was a tough day.

“This marathon was supposed to be fun, but I was baked very early on.

“Any other day would have been a DNF but the crowd and all my friends and family got me through.

“My body is broken. I’m taking some time to let my body and ego recover, Spud may go in to retirement but I’ll be back.”

To make a donation see justgiving.com/angeakamrpotatohead.

Hitchin man Glenn Shiells finished the marathon in memory of his daughter, who died four years ago.

The 35-year-old crossed the finish line after 5:18:55 and has raised £1,043 for Sands– a stillbirth and neonatal death charity.

He said: “Sands is close to myself and my partner, Molly, following the loss of our daughter Lily in 2014.”

About the marathon, he said: “I was carrying a knee injury and from mile 13 it was torture. I’ve never had to endure so much pain and not be able to just give in, but the fact I had raised about £1,000 I knew I had to continue and I dragged myself around. The crowds were amazing.”

Doctor Clea Harmer, chief executive of Sands, said: “I’d like to say a big thank you to Glenn. We wouldn’t be able to continue with our work to support bereaved parents and their families without the dedication and support from people like him.”

You can still sponsor Glenn at justgiving.com/fundraising/glenn-shiells.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the The Comet

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists