Licensing operation puts bar on alcohol sales

PUBLISHED: 11:47 04 May 2006 | UPDATED: 10:06 06 May 2010

The licensing officers at work

The licensing officers at work

A HOTEL and a restaurant were stopped from selling alcohol during a police and council operation. Fire, police and Stevenage Borough Council officers descended on the Old Town last Thursday evening as part of a joint operation checking businesses, pubs a

A HOTEL and a restaurant were stopped from selling alcohol during a police and council operation.

Fire, police and Stevenage Borough Council officers descended on the Old Town last Thursday evening as part of a joint operation checking businesses, pubs and restaurants.

The council's licensing officers found not all premises selling alcohol were up to speed on the new licensing laws.

Officers prevented The Corus Hotel and the Maharajah restaurant, both in High Street, from selling alcohol after their licences did not reflect the personnel employed. The problem at the restaurant was quickly resolved and they were up and running again within 10 minutes of the inspection.

The hotel resolved its problem at lunchtime the next day. The hotel's general manager was unavailable for comment.

Six other premises were either not displaying their premises licence summaries, did not have their premises licences available to view or did not have their personal licences available and were given official warnings.

A council spokesman said: "The Licensing Act 2003 places responsibility with the licence holder to ensure applications are made to the licensing authority to notify us of changes in ownership and personnel at their premises.

"To fail to do this may result in unauthorised licensable activities taking place. This can lead to fines of up to £20,000 and/or six months imprisonment on conviction.

"We take these issues very seriously and will continue to work closely with our partners to ensure that licence holders in Stevenage comply with the requirements of the legislation."

During the operation, advice was given to 34 businesses, one taxi was found to be infringing its licence, and 22 arson risks were identified.

The new community team ward constable for the Old Town, Pc Paul Lawlor, joined the operation and introduced himself to businesses throughout the High Street.

He spoke to businesses concerned with parking in the Old Town and noted incidents of graffiti and vandalism.


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