Jailed boxing coach loses appeal

PUBLISHED: 13:59 01 May 2007 | UPDATED: 11:49 06 May 2010

Geoffrey Glencross

Geoffrey Glencross

A FORMER boxer who became a mentor for youngsters starting out in the sport will have to go the full distance for his drug dealing. He has failed in a challenge at London s Court of Appeal against his nine-year prison sentence. Geoffrey Glencross, of Yarm

A FORMER boxer who became a mentor for youngsters starting out in the sport will have to go the full distance for his drug dealing.

He has failed in a challenge at London's Court of Appeal against his nine-year prison sentence.

Geoffrey Glencross, of Yarmouth Road, Stevenage, pleaded guilty at Luton Crown Court last year to possession of Class A and Class B drugs with intent to supply, simple possession and possession of criminal property.

The 55-year-old builder was brought to book after nearly £200,000 in cash, as well as a large amount of drugs, were found at his partner Patricia Cocklin's home in Valley Way, Stevenage.

When police raided the house they discovered the cash - which was in Euros, Northern Irish, English and Scottish bank notes - cocaine with a potential street value of £50,000 and amphetamines worth up to £9,000. Weighing scales were also found.

At the appeal court on Friday, Glencross' lawyers argued that he had not been given enough credit for his guilty plea, and his claims that he was merely minding the money and drugs for someone else.

However, Mrs Justice Swift, sitting with Mr Justice David Clarke, said the crown court judge was entitled to view Glencross' explanation for the vast sums of money as "wholly implausible".

If he had been looking after it, she said, it would not have been scattered around the house in a number of packages.

She added that Glencross, who had previous convictions, had not pleaded guilty at the earliest opportunity.

The court heard that Glencross was much loved at Stevenage Boxing Club and had "done a good deal to support local youngsters". He had also received a positive report while on remand in prison.

Glencross' son, Mark Glencross, received seven years for drug dealing. Cocklin got five years, while her son David Cocklin got seven years.

Glencross was identified as the prime mover, with the three others taking orders, distributing the drugs and helping out when required.


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