Iron Maiden’s Bruce Dickinson lands at RAF Henlow after wowing Sonisphere’s crowds with First World War aerial display

Bruce Dickinson with the band's mascot Eddie the Head credit: Tom England

Bruce Dickinson with the band's mascot Eddie the Head credit: Tom England - Credit: Archant

After re-enacting dogfight scenes from the First World War above 55,000 people at Sonisphere, Iron Maiden frontman Bruce Dickinson landed at an RAF base before heading back to perform.

Bruce Dickinson, lead singer of Iron Maiden, with Ash Grey-Smart, flight officer at RAF Henlow and h

Bruce Dickinson, lead singer of Iron Maiden, with Ash Grey-Smart, flight officer at RAF Henlow and his son Isaac. Credit: Tom England - Credit: Archant

The qualified pilot, whose band headlined the Knebworth festival on Saturday, visited RAF Henlow with the Great War Display Team – who re-enact shows in replica war planes.

After performing in front of the crowds, he landed at the airfield before quickly returing to the festival by limosine.

Speaking on Saturday, the singer said: “We are basing out of Henlow this weekend with the team to do a commemorative display over the crowds at Knebworth where I just happen to be doing a bit of singing later on today.

“My plane’s a 100% replica of a 1917 Fokker triplane, probably one of the most iconic aircraft in the First World War. It was built by the late John Day who was sadly killed in a flying accident.


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“He was part of the display team and flew a Fokker ‘eindecker’. We managed to keep the aircraft in the UK and in the team after much interest from overseas. We will also be displaying at Farnborough for their three public days, Duxford and of course the RAF Henlow friends and families day at this beautiful airfield which is just perfect for it.

“You have a beautiful airfield, so keep the damn things flying and make sure the take offs equal the landings and it’ll all be ok.”

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