How we had our chips

PUBLISHED: 11:21 09 February 2006 | UPDATED: 09:35 06 May 2010

Tasting the chips

Tasting the chips

You say potato, we say chip! On Monday, fish and chip shops across the country will be firing up their fryers as they prepare for National Chip Week and we at The Comet saw the great opportunity to taste the tatties on offer in our area. The chip, accompa

Lizzy Seal checks out the chips

You say potato, we say chip!

On Monday, fish and chip shops across the country will be firing up their fryers as they prepare for National Chip Week and we at The Comet saw the great opportunity to taste the tatties on offer in our area.

The chip, accompanied by a nice piece of battered fish, is a favourite with the Brits and next week brings the chance to celebrate one of the nation's top meals.

Always willing to join in a celebration, particularly of fine food, we took our wooden forks to five large portions of select chips.

And the winner was... Johnny's of Old Stevenage

They came from shops in North Herts and Mid Beds and were up to the scrutiny of a whole bunch of self-professed chip connoisseurs.

Apparently, we in the UK turn about two million tonnes of potatoes into chips every year, meaning one in four British spuds consumed in Britain are eaten as chips.

The British Potato Council, (a big-wig on all matters potato) is also leading us to believe that they're not really that unhealthy.

If it's Friday night and you're weighing up which takeaway to give your fast-food business to, then for your health's sake, choose the chippie.

An average portion of battered cod and chips contains at least a quarter of the fat and a third fewer calories than a serving of either chicken tikka masala and pilau rice, or sweet and sour pork and egg fried rice.

So, surely they're the obvious choice, especially when combined with the knowledge that the average serving of chips contains more than double the amount of fibre found in an average serving of brown rice or porridge.

Another tip is to choose thick chips, as these absorb much less fat than their skinny cousins.

Armed with the knowledge that chips aren't that bad for you, eager members of staff at The Comet were quick to become spud judges.

Our fried fancies came from Cox's in Letchworth GC, Fish n' Chick'n in Baldock, Johnny's in Stevenage Old Town, Murphy's in Hitchin and Saxon Fish and Chips in Biggleswade.

After much consideration of length and colour, flavour and texture, and following the consumption of many bags of chips, an overwhelming majority chose Johnny's Fish and Chips in Stevenage as their favourite fryers.

Their chips were judged to be cooked "just right", well-sized and generally just very tasty.

The speed at which all the other plates of chips were eaten does, however, suggest that they weren't half bad either.

That was the verdict of Comet staff, but have we made a mistake? If you think you fryer of choice goes the extra mile and batters the opposition email us at editorial@thecomet.net or log on to www.thecomet.net and post your views.

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