Hitchin girl, 9, speaks on BBC R2 about North Herts charity’s support after sudden death of ‘best friend’ brother

PUBLISHED: 17:06 13 November 2020 | UPDATED: 17:06 13 November 2020

Daisy, 9, from Hitchin was interviewed ahead of Children in Need about a special charity. Picture: Vikki Hammond

Daisy, 9, from Hitchin was interviewed ahead of Children in Need about a special charity. Picture: Vikki Hammond

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A brave nine-year-old from Hitchin has spoken on BBC Radio about the importance of a local charity who supported her after her brother suddenly passed away.

Hitchin's Vikki Hammond and daughter Daisy have praised Stand-by-me for their bereavement support. Picture: Vikki HammondHitchin's Vikki Hammond and daughter Daisy have praised Stand-by-me for their bereavement support. Picture: Vikki Hammond

Nine-year-old Daisy, who lives with her family in Hitchin, spoke to the nation about a North Hertfordshire charity that’s dear to her heart on BBC Radio Two last week.

Ahead of Children in Need, Daisy was interviewed about the work of Stand-by-me, and how important the charity has been to her as she deals with bereavement of a sibling.

Now a young ambassador for Stand-by-me, a specialist bereavement charity that offers psycho-educational and therapeutic bereavement support for children dealing with death, Daisy spoke of her experience ahead of Children’s Grief Awareness Week.

Kai, her big brother, passed away on January 20, 2018 – the day before his 16th birthday.

He was born with tubular sclerosis complex – which meant Kai lived with autism, severe epilepsy and was disabled.

Kai passed away in his sleep, of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy – a rare condition that affects less than 2 per 1,000 people with epilepsy.

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Daisy admits she did feel “nervous” at first when she was being interviewed.

But, she bravely spoke about how Kai was her best friend and reserved special praise for the North Hertfordshire charity who helped support her every step of the way.

Vikki Hammond, Daisy’s mum, remembers she was worried about the then seven-year-old more than her other children, because her reaction to the sudden passing of Kai was different.

Initially, Daisy was coping well, but soon she wasn’t able to sleep at night and she suffered with serious anxiety.

Vikki added: “It came out later rather than earlier on with Daisy, her grieving process is still on-going.

“The work of Stand-by-me is absolutely amazing, and they’ve supported my children. Daisy stayed on and found it so helpful, she says they’re like her second family.

“Without them, I don’t think we would be where we are today.”

Beginning Thursday November 19, Children’s Grief Awarness Week is a national campaign aiming to raise awareness of bereaved children and young people. The theme this year is isolation, something that many of us will have felt during the COVID-19 lockdowns.


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