Highs and lows of charity challenge

A mountain of work is common for University of Hertfordshire students – but climbing three mountains in 48 hours is not. Add to this the fact that the students will also be canoeing the three biggest lakes in Scotland, England and Wales within that time

A mountain of work is common for University of Hertfordshire students - but climbing three mountains in 48 hours is not.

Add to this the fact that the students will also be canoeing the three biggest lakes in Scotland, England and Wales within that time and its no wonder that they are already getting in training for their charity challenge next April.

John Lea, 19, of Collenswood Road, Stevenage, is secretary of the University of Hertfordshire Canoe Club.

The psychology student is organising the event to take place during RAG (Raise and Give) week to raise money for two charities - Debra and Colchester Phoenix Swimming Club.

The sporty students will start by paddling the length of Loch Ness before climbing Ben Nevis. They will then make their way to Scafell in the Lake District, followed by canoeing the 12 miles of Lake Windermere, before taking a trip up Snowdon in Wales and finishing with a five-mile paddle in the waters of Lake Bala..

Six students plus some former students will be taking on the three peaks challenge, climbing the three tallest mountains in Britain; Ben Nevis, Scotland (1344m), Scafell, England (978m) and Snowdon, Wales (1085m).

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John said: "This challenge is very hard, climbing any one of these peaks on their own is challenging, but doing all three whilst having to sit in a minibus for hours between mountains and climb some of the mountains in the dark truly is a challenge."

They will also attempt the three lakes challenge where they will paddle the length of the three biggest lakes in Britain; Loch Ness, Scotland, Lake Windermere, England, and Lake Bala, Wales.

John said: "This again is a very hard challenge. Paddling the 30 plus miles of Loch Ness alone could be thought undoable in 24 hours, on top of that two other massive lakes and, again, sitting in a minibus or car for up to six or seven hours driving from one to the other. These factors make it seem almost impossible."

However, the team are trying to make it possible in their aim to collect cash for their chosen charities.

Debra is an organisation that works with people with epidermolysis bullosa (EB) which is a rare condition in which the skin and internal body linings blister at the slightest knock or rub causing painful, open wounds.

The other charity, The Phoenix, is a swimming club which offers a wide range of water-based activities, regardless of disability, age, sex, colour or creed.

John said: "Both of these charities are very worthwhile and need our help so UHCC's way to raise money is a challenge that is a combination of the two.

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