Letchworth school privileged to host Holocaust survivor

PUBLISHED: 12:01 31 March 2019

Fearnhill School headteacher Liz Ellis, year 12 pupil Lily Coward, Holocaust survivor Manfred Goldberg, year 12 pupil Alfie Nott-Tapp and head of humanities Liam Morgan. Picture: DANNY LOO

Fearnhill School headteacher Liz Ellis, year 12 pupil Lily Coward, Holocaust survivor Manfred Goldberg, year 12 pupil Alfie Nott-Tapp and head of humanities Liam Morgan. Picture: DANNY LOO

©2019 Archant

A holocaust survivor visited a Letchworth school last week to speak to students about his childhood.

Manfred Goldberg – a member of the Holocaust Educational Trust – spoke to Year 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13 students at Fearnhill School about his experiences, where he suffered escalating persecution in Germany in the years before the war, before being deported in 1941 by train to the Riga Ghetto in Latvia.

He spoke of how he later spent time in a labour camp, and the terrible murder and cruelty he witnessed.

The testimony was followed by a question and answer session where the pupils were able to discuss and understand the Holocaust in more depth.

Head of humanities Liam Morgan said: “It is a privilege for us to welcome Manfred Goldberg to our school and his testimony will remain a powerful reminder of the horrors so many experienced.
“We are grateful to the Holocaust Educational Trust for co-ordinating the visit and we hope that by hearing Manfred’s testimony, it will encourage our students to learn from the lessons of the Holocaust and make a positive difference in their own lives.”

The Holocaust Educational Trust works in schools, colleges and higher education institutions, providing teacher training workshops and lectures, as well as resource materials.

Its outreach programme allows students and teachers the opportunity to hear survivor testimonies first-hand, and free of charge. This part of the trust’s work reaches 90,000 students a year.

Karen Pollock, chief executive of the Holocaust Educational Trust, said: “The trust educates and engages students from across the UK, from all communities about the Holocaust and there can be no better way than through the firsthand testimony of a survivor.

“Manfred’s story is one of tremendous courage during horrific circumstances and by hearing his testimony, students will have the opportunity to learn where prejudice and racism can ultimately lead.

“At the trust, we impart the history of the Holocaust to young people, to ensure that we honour the memory of those whose lives were lost and take forward the lessons taught by those who survived.”

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the The Comet

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists