Family to fight on after son’s inquest verdict

PUBLISHED: 11:41 09 February 2006 | UPDATED: 09:35 06 May 2010

Andrew Digby-Cameron

Andrew Digby-Cameron

A CORONER has reached a verdict two and a half years after a man s sudden death but his family are still seeking answers. Andrew Digby-Cameron from Bloomfield Drive, Shefford, died in the early hours of July 26, 2003 after he ran across the A1(M) and was

A CORONER has reached a verdict two and a half years after a man's sudden death but his family are still seeking answers.

Andrew Digby-Cameron from Bloomfield Drive, Shefford, died in the early hours of July 26, 2003 after he ran across the A1(M) and was hit by a lorry.

Since Andrew died, his father Alan, from Sandy, has campaigned that foul play was involved, claiming his son's death was not an accident.

In December 2005, the lorry driver was found guilty of making a false driving record but it was not suggested that he was to blame for Mr Digby-Cameron's death.

At Mr Digby-Cameron's inquest last Thursday, coroner Edward Thomas recorded a narrative verdict and confirmed that Mr Digby-Cameron died from severe multiple injuries.

A narrative verdict is a short, factual statement setting out the circumstances of the death, with the aim to more fairly and accurately reflect how the deceased came to their death.

The Digby-Cameron family remain dissatisfied with the investigations made by police into the events leading up to their son's death.

They believe that threats and incidents between their son and his friend, Dean Haxton, are significant to his death.

Representing the family was barrister Louise Jacobs who asked for an adjournment of the inquest.

She said: "There are further matters to investigate and that can only be achieved through adjournment."

But Mr Thomas did not agree and said: "I cannot see any profit from making further enquiries into this.

"I cannot see that my adjournment of this inquest will in fact help me determine the issues.

"I'm not labelling, by narrative I can give a longer verdict.

"There are a number of concerns I feel I need to highlight in response to this death.

"I'll be contacting the Health and Safety Executive with regard to drivers' hours.

"I'll also write to Herts Police about matters that may arise with another force. It was only after my inquest in July 2004 that I got an investigation by Beds Police."

After the inquest, Andrew's father said: "I think we got the best the barrister could make in the circumstances.

"It has shown failures of the police and the Crown Prosecution Service to bring appropriate charges against rogue HGV drivers.

"It has shown failures of Beds Police to properly investigate the crimes that led to the threats to kill my son.

"It's about time some more Shefford people who know information came forward.

"It has dragged on for too long and there are many lessons for police and Crown Prosecution Service to learn from this case.

"I hope there are some changes to the law, especially with regard to jurisdiction.

"If we couldn't get an open verdict then a narrative is probably the best.

"It doesn't close the book.

"We're very, very disappointed and feel let down by the police.

"There's clearly been a failure in communication between police forces and I wouldn't want any other family to go through this.

"I'm not making myself any friends from doing all this but it's just all for my son.

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