Ex-boxer at head of family drugs trade

PUBLISHED: 12:19 22 June 2006 | UPDATED: 10:23 06 May 2010

Geoffrey Glencross - jailed for nine years

Geoffrey Glencross - jailed for nine years

THREE men and a woman involved in a family enterprise to supply cocaine have been jailed for a total of 28 years. A judge said that when police raided a house in Valley Way, Stevenage, they discovered a warehouse and distribution centre for cocaine and

THREE men and a woman involved in a "family" enterprise to supply cocaine have been jailed for a total of 28 years.

A judge said that when police raided a house in Valley Way, Stevenage, they discovered a "warehouse and distribution centre for cocaine and amphetamine".

Judge Michael Kay QC said the dominant figure behind the trade was 54-year-old former boxer Geoffrey Glencross who, while having his own cocaine addiction, was regarded as a mentor to youngsters at Stevenage Amateur Boxing Club.

Also before Luton Crown Court on Friday were his son, Mark, 36, also an ex-boxer, and his fiancee's son David Cocklin, 26, a painter and decorator, who the judge said did his bidding in assisting with drug dealing. His fiancee, Patricia Cocklin, was led into getting involved, said Judge Kay.

Geoffrey Glencross, of Yarmouth Road, Stevenage, pleaded guilty to possessing cocaine and amphetamine with intent to supply and possessing almost £200,000 which were the proceeds of crime. He was jailed for nine years.

The other three defendants all denied conspiracy to supply cocaine and amphetamine, but were convicted by a jury. They also denied possessing the money and they were cleared of that charge.

Mark Glencross, of Sloane Court, and David Cocklin, of Valley Way, both Stevenage, were each jailed for seven years while Patricia Cocklin of Valley Way was jailed for five years.

Nicholas Barraclough, prosecuting, said that during the search on July 21 last year police found cocaine worth up to £50,000, amphetamine worth up to £6,000 and £197,509 in cash in various places in the house.

There were also three sets of electronic scales, a dealer's list and fingerprints and text messages that linked the defendant to dealing in drugs.

Colin Aylott, defending Geoffrey Glencross, said he was only minding the drugs and money for someone else and took complete responsibility. But he said there were numerous references about the good work he had done at the boxing club, saving youngsters from hanging around the streets and getting involved in drugs and crime.

Judge Kay said: "Drugs ruin the lives of young people, not simply to their health but they also cause them to turn to crime in their desperation to obtain money. They generate misery, suffering, crime and violence.

"In my view the others involved in this did your bidding."

He said Patricia Cocklin was led on by those around her and and that it was "extremely sad" that she was before the court.

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