Esme, 3, in choke drama

A PLEASANT family get together turned into a near tragedy when a little girl choked on a coin. Attempts by her mum, grandmother and aunt to dislodge the 20p from Esme Frankland s throat were failing and the three-year-old became semi-conscious and began t

A PLEASANT family get together turned into a near tragedy when a little girl choked on a coin.

Attempts by her mum, grandmother and aunt to dislodge the 20p from Esme Frankland's throat were failing and the three-year-old became semi-conscious and began turning blue.

In a last desperate bid to save her life, her grandfather turned her upside down, held her by her ankles and whacked her on the back.

Thankfully, it was enough to bring up the coin.


You may also want to watch:


Esme's mum Rachel, 40, had taken her to her grandparents' home in New Road, Clifton. Also there was Rachel's sister, Steph, 45.

"Esme had been to the shop with my sister and had 20p in her purse," said Rachel who lives in Ivel Road, Shefford.

Most Read

"I thought she was safe with money. She plays shops, giving change. She was indoors watching TV. She may have been day dreaming, not paying attention and put the 20p in her mouth and swallowed it.

"She started to choke. I put her over my knee and patted her on the back but nothing happened. She was getting less and less breath and was being sick. She got worse and worse so we called 999.

"We all thought we were going to lose her."

Rachel's father Alex, 68, came in from the garden where he had been mowing the lawn

"He panicked but what he did saved her life," said Rachel.

Esme, who attends Woodlands Pre-School in Clifton, was left swollen and bruised with burst blood vessels in her face due to the exertion of trying to cough up the coin.

During the drams, Rachel was uncertain about the best way to help her daughter and now wants other parents to have expert advice on what to do in the event of such an emergency.

Gary Sanderson, communications manager for the East of England Ambulance Service which had a crew at the home for about 40 minutes on Saturday checking out Esme, said: "First and foremost, If anyone is confronted with someone choking, please dial 999 immediately and ask for an ambulance."

Choking - A foreign object that is stuck at the back of the throat may block the throat or cause muscular spasm. Young children especially are prone to choking. A child may choke on food, or may put small objects into their mouth and cause a blockage of the airway. If the blockage of the area airway is mild, the casualty should be able to clear it; if it is severe they will be unable to speak, cough, or breathe, and will eventually lose consciousness.

Recognition

Mild obstruction

Casualty able to speak, cry, cough or breathe.

Severe obstruction

Casualty is unable to speak, cry, cough or breathe.

Casualty will eventually become unconscious without assistance.

Treatment for adult or child

Your aims are to remove the obstruction and to arrange urgent removal to hospital if necessary.

If the obstruction is mild

Encourage them to continue coughing.

Remove any obvious obstruction from the mouth.

If the obstruction is severe

Give up to five back blows.

Check the mouth and remove any obvious obstruction.

If the obstruction is still present:

Give up to five abdominal thrusts.

Check the mouth and remove any obvious obstruction.

If the obstruction does not clear after three cycles of back blows and abdominal thrusts:

Continue until help arrives.

Treatment for infants

Your aims are to remove the obstruction and to arrange urgent removal to hospital if necessary.

If the infant is distressed, is unable to cry cough, or breathe:

Lay them face down along your forearm, with their head low, and support the back and head.

Give up to five back blows, with the heel of your hand.

Check the infant's mouth; remove any obvious obstructions.

Do not do a finger sweep of the mouth.

If the obstruction is still present:

Turn the infant onto his back and give up to five chest thrusts.

Use two fingers, push inwards and upwards (towards the head) against the infants breastbone, one finger's breadth below the nipple line.

The aim is to relieve the obstruction with each chest thrust rather than necessarily doing all five.

Check the mouth.

If the obstruction does not clear after three cycles of back blows and chest thrusts:

Continue until help arrives.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus