Schoolboy builds antennae receiving satellite images from home

Denni Davies, who is in Year 11 at The Nobel School, built his very own antennae from his back garden

Denni Davies, who is in Year 11 at The Nobel School, built his very own antennae from his back garden, with a little help from his dad - Credit: Courtesy of The Nobel School

An "impressive and hardworking" Stevenage schoolboy, who constructed an antennae that can receive radio signals from overhead satellites, has been praised by his school for his colossal achievement.

Over the Easter break, Year 11 student Denni Davies built his very own double cross dipole antenna. Initially designed to listen to radio broadcasts across the country, Denni also used the contraption to receive images from satellites as they pass overhead.

Denni Davies is in Year 11 at The Nobel School, Stevenage

Denni Davies is in Year 11 at The Nobel School, Stevenage - Credit: Courtesy of The Nobel School

"For as long as I can remember, the topics of space and satellites have been of great interest to me," Denni said. "Whether it were probes designed to help research distant planets or space stations travelling thousands of metres a second over our heads, the thought of space exploration is amazing.

"So, when I discovered online that it was possible to receive pictures directly from weather satellites as they passed overhead, I was compelled to give the project a try."

With the help of his dad, Denni constructed the device over two days, using instructions he found on the internet. Merely using some planks of wood, coaxial cable and aluminium wires, Denni hooked his contraption up to a small USB SDR and a laptop, and he began recording radio signals.

Denni Davies, who is in Year 11 at The Nobel School, has managed to capture images from satellites as they pass overhead

Denni Davies, who is in Year 11 at The Nobel School, has managed to capture images from satellites as they pass overhead - Credit: Courtesy of The Nobel School

Denni added: "Though deeply fascinated by the project, I also chose to try it out given that activities such as this help students build a large appreciation for both science as a whole and demonstrate to them the important real-life applications of concepts taught in subjects, such as physics.

"I would certainly encourage anybody with the patience and determination to attempt putting together their own pictures, should they find the time."

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A representative from The Nobel School said of Denni's achievements: "Denni is an impressive and hardworking young man who has a world of opportunities in front of him. His excellence in school and kind nature makes him a very well-rounded individual with a bright future ahead. We look forward to seeing the many accomplishments in his future."

The school is currently working with Denni to put him on a path that may ultimately see him attending Oxford or Cambridge.

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