Drug addict stays locked up to beat habit

PUBLISHED: 14:51 11 April 2006 | UPDATED: 09:58 06 May 2010

A HOMELESS drug addict who stole house keys and then returned to use them to burgle the house asked to remain in prison. Paul Moran, 37, had the chance of drug treatment in the community, but his barrister said Moran did not feel mentally strong enough to

A HOMELESS drug addict who stole house keys and then returned to use them to burgle the house asked to remain in prison.

Paul Moran, 37, had the chance of drug treatment in the community, but his barrister said Moran did not feel mentally strong enough to do that.

William Noble, defending, said: "He is asking for a custodial sentence so that he can continue his drug courses in a prison environment. He feels he is too much of a risk to be released, and will be just setting himself up to fail."

Moran pleaded guilty to burglary, attempted burglary and theft and was jailed for 12 months at Luton Crown Court on Friday.

Martin Yale, prosecuting, said the occupier of a house in Hopewell Road, Baldock, noticed the keys she had left in her back door were missing and spent two hours searching for them, before calling a friend to come and change the locks.

While the friend was there he heard noises outside as if someone was trying to get in and saw someone ducking down. Moran ran off but was arrested shortly after.

He admitted he had taken the keys the night before and returned with the intention of burgling the house. He said he needed money to fund a £50 a day drug habit.

Mr Noble told the court: "He is a man with nothing - no home, no job, no partner. He had been doing well over the last few years but the pull of heroin proved too great following the breakdown of a relationship."

Judge Richard Foster told Moran: "You life is dogged by heroin and unless you rid yourself of that addiction you will have a thoroughly miserable life.

"I was prepared to make a community order with a drug treatment condition but you have been candid enough to admit you are not strong enough for that.


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