Capacious base for a carpentry business

PUBLISHED: 11:50 21 August 2008 | UPDATED: 16:29 05 May 2010

The Wesleyan Chapel c 1920 with No 68 and  cottages behind

The Wesleyan Chapel c 1920 with No 68 and cottages behind

64, 66, 68 Shortmead Street WILLIAM Farrington appears to have owned the capacious No 64 in 1838, but carpenter Jeremiah Brooks was there in 1841. William Field, also a carpenter, followed him in 1851 with Field s Yard behind containing two cottages. Wi

64, 66, 68 Shortmead Street

WILLIAM Farrington appears to have owned the capacious No 64 in 1838, but carpenter Jeremiah Brooks was there in 1841. William Field, also a carpenter, followed him in 1851 with Field's Yard behind containing two cottages.

William was still a carpenter employing two men in 1861, but he was a master builder employing three men and two boys in 1871 until his death in 1898. The business then passed to his son-in-law Alfred Taylor, also a carpenter.

Alfred appears to have moved to 66 & 68 in 1901 when John Owen Jones, surveyor to the rural district council, lived there. Montford Woodham moved there from No 2 Shortmead Street in 1908 as a baker and dairyman with his yard behind in Chapel Fields.

After Mr Woodham died in 1959 there were numerous alterations. A flat was created in 1963 and a new shop front for a sub post office and general stores in 1964.

A takeaway food service and tea rooms opened in 1980 and was extended in 1983. Then there were further alterations to create a shop for Pine Antiques and an office for Boss Hire in 2001.

The whole property and garden was up for sale in 2003 offering an enormous residence with shop frontage, seven bedrooms, two bathrooms and two reception rooms. The new owners sympathetically altered the property into a residential dwelling with bay windows.

History has now repeated itself with a planning application for the erection of a detached dwelling house with double garage on land at the rear. This was first applied for in 1992, but the building work is just completed. It is possible that the site was the original location of Field's Yard.

No 66-68 Shortmead Street is considered to have been one building constructed about 1800, with a second front doorway added to the original central doorway at one time. It is shown on the 1838 tithe award plan but with no indication as to ownership or occupation.

Thomas Handley, officer of excise, appears to have lived there in1841 followed by George Bucknall, general practitioner, in 1861, then John Farmer Smith in 1871.

Possibly it was then divided into two and occupied by Jane Luck and John Tebbs in 1881, with Mary Ferguson, widow, and one empty cottage in 1891. Mary Ferguson and Frederick Aggis coachbuilder are shown in the 1901 census prior to Alfred Taylor moving from No. 64 later in 1901 and he occupied the premises with his family until his death in 1930.

To be continued

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