Cadets on cloud nine

PUBLISHED: 11:50 06 July 2006 | UPDATED: 10:25 06 May 2010

A cadet in the cockpit

A cadet in the cockpit

THREE air cadets saw their lives turned upside down when they visited an RAF base. The cadets who enjoyed a taste of aerobatics at RAF Wyton in Cambridgeshire were from 22 Sandy Squadron Air Training Corps (ATC). For cadets Laura Nundy and Helen Taylor, b

THREE air cadets saw their lives turned upside down when they visited an RAF base.

The cadets who enjoyed a taste of aerobatics at RAF Wyton in Cambridgeshire were from 22 Sandy Squadron Air Training Corps (ATC).

For cadets Laura Nundy and Helen Taylor, both aged 14, it was their first experience of flying which they really enjoyed.

Thirty minutes after take off the girls were getting a different view of the earth as their pilot put the aircraft through a series of barrel rolls and loops.

"The girls landed with big grins all over their faces and wanted to do it all over again," said Flt Lt Margaret Bell, commanding officer of 22 Sandy Squadron ATC.

The third cadet who reached for the sky was Robert Hubbard who has more experience than most young teenagers of flying.

Cadet Hubbard, 14, has already undertaken flying lessons at Cranfield aerodrome on the Pitts Special, Tomahawk and Cessna, so the Grob Tutor he was flying in at RAF Wyton was a new experience.

His pilot was retired Air Chief Marshal (ACM) John May who said after their flight: "He is a switched on cadet and will go far. I am recommending him to the operations commander for future training."

Cadet Hubbard has recorded over 25 hours in his log book and is working towards his Private Pilot's Licence and wants to become a staff cadet at Wyton and undertake a flying scholarship and then pursue a flying career.

"I didn't know he was an ACM and I can't believe what he said afterwards," said cadet Hubbard.

"The Grob Tutor is a heavier aircraft to manoeuvre when flying than a Pitts Special but there is not a lot of difference. I had great fun flying it with the ACM's help.

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