SMALL BUSINESSES MUST BE RECOGNISED FOR THEIR ROLE AS SKILLS TRAINERS

Small businesses that offer on-the-job training are contributing to a skilled workforce, but are going totally unrecognised, the Federation of Small Businesses (FSB) has warned. According to the FSB s biennial survey of 8,700 members, learning by doin

Small businesses that offer on-the-job training are contributing to a

skilled workforce, but are going totally unrecognised, the Federation of

Small Businesses (FSB) has warned.

According to the FSB's biennial survey of 8,700 members, 'learning by doing'


You may also want to watch:


was one of the most popular and effective training methods for employees.

Nearly 70 per cent of responding firms saw sustained growth after their

Most Read

employees taught themselves by getting on with the job, while more than half

grew as a result of being given on the job training by a superior.

But the survey results, entitled Putting the economy back on track: Skills

and training, point out that much beneficial training is unaccredited by

policy makers, leaving small businesses and their employees skilled but with

no official qualifications.

Respondents also reported that the Government's 'Train to Gain' programme,

which offers training schemes to small firms, is not meeting their training

needs.

This illustrates that it is often easier for small firms to provide their

own tailored training for their employees. However, the programme has

recently been reformed, and the FSB hopes to see new funding allocated to

the hardest-to-reach and smallest businesses, which need it most.

Dr Gary Packham, Head of Enterprise at Glamorgan University, where the

report was compiled, said, "Many small firms are finding that there are

basic skills shortages in new staff and that it is not only efficient but

effective to train their staff in-house. However, for the smallest firms,

providing training can be a challenge, and certainly is a struggle when they

train up their staff but aren't recognised for it."

Herts-based FSB Policy Representatve Tim Weaver said, "It's time that small

businesses that give their employees their own beneficial training are

officially recognised for doing so. The role small businesses play in this

area of training the UK's workforce should be properly acknowledged and the

achievements of small firm employees actually recognised under official

accreditation.

"In the current economic climate, it is also imperative that the Government,

employers and employees invest in the skills they need to both support small

businesses and get people back into work during these difficult times.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter