Bright fuchsia for medieval church

PUBLISHED: 11:53 13 July 2006 | UPDATED: 10:25 06 May 2010

Historic St Mary Magdalen Church at Caldecote is to host a fuchsia festival at the weekend

Historic St Mary Magdalen Church at Caldecote is to host a fuchsia festival at the weekend

ONE of the smallest medieval churches in Hertfordshire is set to host a spectacular flower festival this weekend. Organisers Hertfordshire and Bedfordshire Fuchsia Society has a unique venue in the Church of St Mary Magdalen at Caldecote, Newnham, near Ba

ONE of the smallest medieval churches in Hertfordshire is set to host a spectacular flower festival this weekend.

Organisers Hertfordshire and Bedfordshire Fuchsia Society has a unique venue in the Church of St Mary Magdalen at Caldecote, Newnham, near Baldock.

It is a redundant church which is in the care of the Friends of Friendless Churches, a registered charity working with the Ancient Monuments Society to save disused but beautiful places of worship of architectural and historic interest.

St Mary Magdalen was built around 1400 from clunch in the nearby Ashwell quarry and its octagonal font dates from 1480.

The church is only 51 feet long and it is the only remaining building from an officially designated deserted medieval village.

The village of Caldecote was first mentioned in The Domesday Book, though archaeology has shown continuous occupation from before 1050 until the site was largely abandoned in the 15th and 16th centuries. Today it has a population of only 16.

All kinds of specialist fuchsia plants and arrangements will be on display and for sale on Saturday and Sunday between 10am and 4pm.

There will also be material on the history of the village and the church available for visitors. Admission is free though donations will be welcome towards the work of the Friends of the Friendless Churches.

For more information call 01462 742440.


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