Biggleswade Muslim community’s message of peace helps fight negative views about Islam

Biggleswade residents chatting to members of the Islamic Faith & Social Group for Women & Children.

Biggleswade residents chatting to members of the Islamic Faith & Social Group for Women & Children. Pic Rabia Syed - Credit: Archant

Muslims in Biggleswade took to the streets to share the blessings of Ramadan with people in the town and help display the peaceful nature of the faith which has been overshadowed by the recent terror attacks.

The event helped people to learn about the peaceful nature of Islam. Pic Rabia Syed.

The event helped people to learn about the peaceful nature of Islam. Pic Rabia Syed. - Credit: Archant

Members of Biggleswade’s Islamic Faith & Social Group for Women & Children (Rosebuds) including Rabia Syed and volunteers of the Muslim community – held a stall at Biggleswade Market last weekend.

The theme of the stall and the purpose was to inform people about the month of Ramadan, which ran from May 26 to June 24, and to share the meaning of it with everyone.

The event was also supported by the town’s Viceroy restaurant in Biggleswade, Biggleswade Islamic Cultural Centre, and WAMY UK.

Muslims all around the world fast every day during the month from dawn to sunset, abstaining from food, drink and other desires.

Members of the Islamic community shared dates and samosas with people in Biggleswade town centre. Pi

Members of the Islamic community shared dates and samosas with people in Biggleswade town centre. Pic: Rabia Syed - Credit: Archant

The month is an annual period of reflection, purification and spiritual renewal. Extra time is devoted to prayers, doing good deeds and giving more to charity.

The volunteers handed out free date pots, samosas, goody bags and sweets to people in the town centre.

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They also had a table set up offering CDs containing peaceful Qur’anic recitation, various informative leaflets for people to read, and pocket-sized copies of the Qur’an for people to browse and take away with them.

Disney character Mickey Mouse was also present to take pictures with children and have a friendly chat.

Members of the Islamic Faith & Social Group for Women & Children chatted to passers by about the mea

Members of the Islamic Faith & Social Group for Women & Children chatted to passers by about the meaning of Ramadan. Pic Rabia Syed - Credit: Archant

Rabia said: “We were able to provide better understanding about Ramadan, and help in clearing any misconceptions and build positive relationships within the community.

“This type of interaction encouraged people to stop and have a chat with us and for us to explain the significance of handing out dates for people to try.

“At the time of sunset when Muslims open their fast, they first eat a date. This is because it has been mentioned by the Prophet Muhammed.

“Therefore this is something that Muslims follow as a guidance and part of the faith and is a very important element to the month of Ramadan.

Mickey Mouse helped entertain the children at the Islamic faith event. Pic: Rabia Syed

Mickey Mouse helped entertain the children at the Islamic faith event. Pic: Rabia Syed - Credit: Archant

“The feedback and interaction from the public was truly amazing. People asked questions, shared their feedback and views about the stall and expressed their honest views about the negativity that is being spread within the media about Islam.

“People highlighted themselves that the negativity has nothing to do with any faith and were happy that we held this stall as it illustrated true peace and an example of what Islam is about and what it represents. People really liked the fact that we chose to do this whilst we were actually fasting, as this allowed people to actually see our beliefs in action and as an example.”

Ramadan is followed by the festival of Eid, which began yesterday, and finishes this evening.

It is a celebration during which Muslims break the fasting of Ramadan.

For more information about Rosebuds click here.

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