Bad news for building

PUBLISHED: 17:15 31 August 2006 | UPDATED: 10:48 06 May 2010

The building at Vinegar Hill which planners say is in breach of regulations

The building at Vinegar Hill which planners say is in breach of regulations

A BUSINESS is in hot water for breaching planning regulations. Mid Beds District Council says Savin Wholesalers erected a building at Vinegar Hill, Hatch, contrary in appearance to the planning permission granted and for breaching its permitted use, by mo

A BUSINESS is in hot water for breaching planning regulations.

Mid Beds District Council says Savin Wholesalers erected a building at Vinegar Hill, Hatch, contrary in appearance to the planning permission granted and for breaching its permitted use, by moving and operating there, a trade wholesale imported flower and plant distribution business from Sandy.

The council's development control committee agreed last week to enforcement action against Savins Wholesalers for an unauthorised building and unauthorised use of that building, after it received information about the site from council planning enforcement officers.

On December 16 last year, the council approved a planning application at the site for the erection of a horticultural glasshouse with permitted use for horticultural purposes only.

This would allow, says the council, the growing from seed and growing on of young plants and limited ancillary activities including the sale of those plants and associated goods like pots, compost and the processing of them for wholesale distribution.

The building now constructed on the site differs significantly, says the council, from the approved scheme. Changes include a large canopied area at the front entrance, a substantial cold room in the central core and a mezzanine floor added at the front of the building.

John Hill, Mid Beds District Council's enforcement team leader said: "The current use of the building for storage and distribution is not suitable at its current rural location, being contrary to the council's planning policies for such development.

"It would normally be expected to be found in a built-up area such as the company's former site in an industrial area of Sandy. The site is also attracting a number of lorries very early in the morning, causing disturbance to neighbouring properties.

"Enforcement action will now follow in the form of an enforcement notice requiring that Savins stop their current use of the building. The company may appeal against this notice, in which case, the outcome will have to be awaited to see if the notice is upheld by the planning inspectorate."

The committee agreed to give the company three months to satisfy the council that the building is now being used for the correct horticultural use. If this is achieved, the council may then invite a planning application from the company to retain the building as it stands now and to retain its approved horticultural use.

Several attempts to get a comment from company owner Gary Savins proved impossible as staff said he was busy.


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