3,000 mile endurance target for cyclist Jim

IT is regarded as the greatest feat of human endurance on the planet – 11 days and 3,000 miles on a bike, pushing the body to its limit. Jim Rees, 40, will put himself through the physical torture of cycling 20 hours a day from San Diego to Atlantic City

IT is regarded as the greatest feat of human endurance on the planet - 11 days and 3,000 miles on a bike, pushing the body to its limit.

Jim Rees, 40, will put himself through the physical torture of cycling 20 hours a day from San Diego to Atlantic City in June's coast-to-coast Race Across America, regarded as the toughest sporting event in the world.

The father of six, from Bramley Close, Shefford, has spent his adult life pursuing his dream of achieving supreme fitness.

When he is not punishing his body to the edge of destruction he is an executive coach, keynote speaker and author.

So why is he prepared to push himself through the pain barrier for 11 days, riding up to 300 miles a day across America in high summer and fork out £50,000 for the pleasure?

"More people have climbed Everest than finished this race," said Mr Rees, whose training programme last weekend involved two bike rides, 80 miles on Saturday and 190 miles on Sunday.

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"I am still looking for sponsorship but whatever happens I will be going with my Team Inspiration even if I have to burn a hole in my credit card."

Mr Rees began training for the race in July last year with a routine that would have a hardened SAS soldier gasping for air.

Pedalling more miles in a week than the average motorist drives, Mr Rees is now spending almost every waking hour in the saddle or sweating in the gym courtesy of the Champneys health retreat at Henlow.

His team of two doctors, nutritionist, psychologist and others with driving and logistical skills will shadow him across America.

Fitness, he says, will not be a barrier to him crossing the finishing line, with the only threat to his ambitions being the odd wandering racoon, rednecks firing guns when he hits the Appalachian Mountains and the huge trucks on the highways.

"If I can steer clear of all those problems then I believe I can finish the race," said Mr Rees, who will return to our shores and begin his next quest to launch his fitter schools project as a build-up to the 2012 Olympics.

For more information about Mr Rees log on to www.teaminspiration.co.uk

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