Gem of an idea is a real dog’s dinner

TO each his own seems to me to be a good philosophy, usually. But another saying, let sleeping dogs lie, also sprang to mind when I received a press release this week. This little gem of business promotion extolled the virtues of people having their pets

TO each his own seems to me to be a good philosophy, usually.

But another saying, let sleeping dogs lie, also sprang to mind when I received a press release this week.

This little gem of business promotion extolled the virtues of people having their pets turned into diamonds - after they die of course.

It brings a whole new meaning to "precious", a word of affection often applied to our four legged friends.


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I'm all for people having pets. I've had some myself and know that they can bring great joy into our lives.

But I reckon it is going a step - if not a walkie - too far to send one's pet's ashes off to have the carbon turned into a diamond which can be worn in a ring or pendant.

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The press release happily gives the assurance that stones can be created from any pet, from a hamster to a horse.

I don't know how the transformation process works but I cannot imagine that you would get much of a sparkler from the remains of a hamster.

But surely those from a horse could result in a rock to rival the Koh-i-Noor.

The company which began offering this macabre service in 2004 - initially blue or yellow stones but from this month increasing the colour range by adding red, white and green - says that many of its customers have found real comfort from the knowledge that they are close to their much loved pet at all times.

"It's the ultimate way of cherishing a beloved pet's life," said a spokesman.

Hmmm...I think most people will be satisfied enough to have their memories and a few photographs.

That is certainly the cheaper option. Having your pet turned into something considerably harder than dog biscuits will set you back a minimum of £2,100.

It was a diamond day on Friday when I and my colleagues Steve, Marcus, Sam, Michelle and Kelly left our desks behind and took the train to Ipswich.

Our destination was the Suffolk Showground where journalists were gathering en masse for the EDF Energy East of England Media Awards.

Half of us found we were sharing a table with three presenters and a PR girl from BBC Look East.

Among them was Mike Liggins - who seems to specialise in reporting from out-of-the-way places on unusual subjects - who gave us a hearty welcome, asked where we were from and then confessed he had not heard of The Comet.

That in itself was a little surprising as our stories are regularly followed up by the BBC - and Anglia TV - and our front pages have been featured on air.

Mike was sitting next to his colleague Andrew Sinclair who was up for an award but did not get it.

The last but one award was for the free weekly newspaper of the year which The Comet won.

On returning to the table after collecting our trophy and certificate I could not resist remarking to Mr Liggins: "Now you have heard of The Comet.

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