Election battle could end in tears for Hillary

I HAVE a theory as to why Barack Obama is doing so well in the race to win the Democratic nomination in the run-up to the contest for the US presidency. I reckon that party voters have so much trouble trying to remember his unusual name that they have to

I HAVE a theory as to why Barack Obama is doing so well in the race to win the Democratic nomination in the run-up to the contest for the US presidency.

I reckon that party voters have so much trouble trying to remember his unusual name that they have to keep repeating it as they go to vote and by the time they get to the polling booth they have it so much in mind that they put their cross against it even if they do not mean to support him. It worked in Iowa.

Even after the many times I have seen and heard his name, I still have to think twice before saying it - and then I often get it wrong.

So is it any wonder that the person who is his main rival in the race for the White House - and the one who should really get the job because her husband has done it before and it is only fair that she has a go - perhaps blows away her political credibility by resorting to feminine guile and brings on the tears. And that seemed to work in New Hampshire.


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Thank goodness that over here in stiff-upper-lip-land there was no such show of emotion when Gordon finally claimed his long-awaited right to take over from Tony and do the shortest house move possible. After all, we don't bother asking the people to decide who their leader should be.

l Away from politics, the world of retail and high finance can be puzzling.

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Paying out money is seldom a pleasure but I did not used to mind so much when it came to my monthly bill from Courts the furnishers.

Rather than do it by direct debit I preferred to settle it with cash and I was in the habit of doing so by popping into the company's showroom in Hermitage Road, Hitchin, where the lady behind the counter was friendly and chatty and kept me updated on how her daughter was getting on in the army.

It was a bit of a surprise when the store closed. After the troubled Courts went into administration in 2004, the usual monthly demands for payment dried up and when I enquired what was going on I was told there was a computer problem and to wait until it had been fixed.

That went on for a year or more during which time I made no payment but then, inevitably, came a letter asking me to settle the outstanding amount in full.

It was only £103 so I sent off a cheque.

This week I discovered where my money probably went, and realised that I was in the wrong business. For some, failure can mean untold wealth.

I read that advisers to Courts have collected more than £35m in fees since it went into administration.

The group's pension fund remains in limbo, former staff are still waiting to be paid and creditors are unlikely to receive a penny in compensation.

One of them said of the £35m: "They needed less than that to keep it going."

Such can be the way of big business.

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