A true sacrifice

PUBLISHED: 12:26 16 November 2006 | UPDATED: 11:14 06 May 2010

SIR - The Nation sat on Remembrance Sunday with a lump in their throats at the sacrifice people made for our freedom. We are giving our country away, it is not ours any more. You see the bravest of people standing around in the cold with tins collecting m

SIR - The Nation sat on Remembrance Sunday with a lump in their throats at the sacrifice people made for our freedom. We are giving our country away, it is not ours any more.

You see the bravest of people standing around in the cold with tins collecting money when they should be at home with their feet up. They have done their bit. Yet we can look after everyone else who decides to come and foist themselves on our country. If people do come here they should live by our rules and way of life and respect it. After all it is our country and no matter how they dress it up they are our guests.

Our old lion has been asleep, it is about time he woke up.

What we need is a leader capable of waking him up. Unfortunately no one springs to mind.

T. Stafford-Bell

SIR - A poem about Remembrance Day.

Remembrance Day

Years ago before I was born soldiers ran through barbwire torn as guns were fired into that hell, poppies grew where young men fell. The poppies rise at the end, the guns were used for water then. All are happy for that they survive but sad for mates that they have died. We should remember those that died their families at home who surely cried for it is a great sacrifice made, that means for us are freedom is saved.

By Emma Stock aged 7

SIR - Over the last two weeks it was my general impression that it was mainly older people wearing the British Legion's red poppy. It was encouraging, therefore, to have Hannah Gray, as a younger person, reminding us of the importance of Remembrance Day.

I am a generation ahead of Hannah so relate to the Second World War more directly. I was fortunate in that my father returned home safely. However I was six years old and at school before we were able to get to know one another (obviously other members of my family had been affected by his absence too) so I also wear a red poppy in remembrance of all who served in any way, to preserve our culture and democracy.

Nevertheless I also wear a white poppy - I can see no dilemma or disrespect to others in wearing both in order to recognise that peace is a fragile state and that we need to campaign and work to maintain that state. War should be the last resort, in my view, of relationships between nations.

The white peace poppy is not a new trendy innovation. It was first made by women in 1933, women who had lost loved ones in the First World War and feared the developments during the 1930s that ultimately led to the outbreak of war in 1939. Readers can find out more, if they wish, by accessing www.whitepoppy.org.uk

A democracy allows for these differing views. I sometimes wonder if some people equate the white poppy with a white feather! It takes a certain amount of grit to make a stand over some issues. On the other hand, if Hannah merely wants to provoke a response I am happy to oblige.!

K Tuck

Hitchin

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